The School on Constitution

I am writing to thank you for the report published in the January 15-31, 2014 issue of MEL on the Party School on Constitution that was conducted in Delhi on December 28-29, 2013 and I was also pleased to know that the School was conducted in Mumbai on January 4-5, 2014. I am happy to know that the

I am writing to thank you for the report published in the January 15-31, 2014 issue of MEL on the Party School on Constitution that was conducted in Delhi on December 28-29, 2013 and I was also pleased to know that the School was conducted in Mumbai on January 4-5, 2014. I am happy to know that the

CGPI is continuing its efforts to educate the rank and file of the Party, especially on the core issue of rights and the nature of the Constitution. It is particularly important in the context of India, where the Constitution has been raised to the status of something that has fallen from the heavens and any word of criticism is considered and passed off an anti-national.

It is the advanced nature of the theoretical preparedness of the Party which has enabled it to carry out this work of educating its members. The report captures succinctly the nature of the present day 1950 Constitution of India, which was drafted by the members of the Constituent Assembly that was not elected by the people of India. But rather that it is this Constitution that safeguards the rights of the bourgeoisie, which inherited state power from the colonial occupier, and legitimized its rule through the adoption of the 1950 Constitution. In particular, the Constitution of India safeguards the powers of those who are an exploiting minority while doing nothing for the rest of the population, in whose name it claims to rule. It does not recognize the rights of the workers and peasants who constitute the majority of the country. It does not recognize the rights of nations that constitute modern day India. In fact, the Constitution does nothing to break with the past, but rather continues the colonial legacy which it has perfected.

The Constitution guarantees supreme power to the executive and supposedly has put in place safeguards to limit it. While this may be the case in many superficial instances, the fact is that the state has the power to arm itself with draconian powers in the name of defending the Constitution and / or the integrity of India. It is important that the rank and file of the revolutionary cadre is educated in these basic facts so as to pave the path to the future. I thank the CGPI for its brave initiative in this regard.

Sincerely,

A. Narayan, Bangalore

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